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"and when he gets to heaven,to saint peter he will tell:
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"and when he gets to heaven,
to saint peter he will tell:
"Just another soldier reporting, sir
I've served my time in hell."

???

i know i've seen this several times, reused by many ppl.

thanks
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 08-21-04Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"And when he goes to heaven/
To Saint Peter he will tell:/
Another Marine reporting, sir;/
I've served my time in hell!"

The attribtuion is unknown but it was an epitaph for a certain PFC Cameron, who died at Guadalcanal, 1942.

* * *
Friends, books, a cheerful heart, and conscience clear
Are the most choice companions we have here.~William Mather
 
Posts: 19577 | Location: CT | Registered: 08-30-00Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do believe Hal Popplewell; USMC 1971 - 1979, is the Author of this quote, and it is the last verse of a longer poem :

You can have your army Kakhis,
And your navy blues,
Here's a different sort of fighting man,
I'll introduce to you.

His uniform is unlike
Any you've ever seen;
And the Germans called him Devil Dog,
But his real name is Marine!

He was born on Parris Island (San Diego or the Hills of Quantico)
The land that God forgot.
The sand was 14 inches deep,
the sun was blazing hot.

He'd get up every morning,
Way before the sun,
And he'd run a hundred miles or more,
Before the day was done.

He fought in the cold of Korea,
In the heat of Viet Nam.
When ever our country goes to war,
The Marines are first to land.

We'll fight them on the ground,
We'll fight them in the sky,
When the Army and Navy are heading home,
The Marines are standing by.

And when he gets to heaven,
To St. Peter he will tell,
"Another Marine reporting, Sir,
I've served my time in Hell!"


I hope this is useful to you :-)
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Derbyshire, England | Registered: 01-16-08Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If only there were a book that gave reliable sources for all famous quotations... Wait! There is one! The recently published Yale Book of Quotations has the following:

When the final taps is sounded and we lay aside life's cares,
And we do the last and gloried parade on heaven's shining stairs,
And the angels bid us welcome and the harps begin to play
We can draw a million canteen checks and spend them in a day.
It is then we'll hear St. Peter tell us loudly with a yell,
"Take a front seat, you soldier men, you've done your hitch in Hell."

Frank B. Camp, "Our Hitch in Hell" (1917). A better known later variant is: "When he gets to Heaven, / To St. Peter he will tell, / One more Marine reporting, Sir, / I've served my time in Hell."
 
Posts: 53 | Location: New Haven, CT | Registered: 01-03-03Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This was written by my father while serving on Guadalcanal with the First Marine Division, H Company, Second Battalion, First Regiment, in WWII. Bill Cameron was his best friend and was killed by bombs dropped from Japanese planes. He wrote it as an epitaph for Bill's grave.

Since he wrote this in 1942 it is doubtful that Hal Popplewell wrote it. Especially since Popplewell mentions Korea and Vietnam in his poem. He may have written the poem but the last verse belongs to my dad.

There is a book of war quotes....and I believe it is titled "The Dictionary of War Quotations" (I might be mistaken about the title...I have the book at home but I am not at home). In the book it does credit the quote as appearing first as an epitaph on Pfc. Bill Cameron's grave on Guadalcanal.

Regards,
Jim
guadalcanaljournal.com
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 02-20-08Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't mean in any way to detract from the service and heroism of Jim's dad fighting on Guadalcanal (my own father won the Bronze Star in the Battle of the Bulge), but it is very unlikely that he wrote this poem or even just the last paragraph. In what month do you think he wrote it?

Fred Shapiro
Editor
Yale Book of Quotations
 
Posts: 53 | Location: New Haven, CT | Registered: 01-03-03Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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my grandfather did a veriation of that poem in WWII our family thought he wrote it but it looks like he only changed some of the words he was also in the ccc camps and i've seen other veriations of it with the ccc as well.he named it a hitch in hell

 
Posts: 1 | Location: Du Bois, Pa, USA | Registered: 03-06-08Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To set all you Strait, this Poem was written in WW1 and was about Soldiers not Marines...

Get you facts strait...........
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 11-30-08Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The origonal is a long poem like the above copy and is ABOUT SOLDIERS NOT MARINES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 11-30-08Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You know, to be totally frank, they all went through hell, so, to be honest, it may not have just one writer. Sure, someone wrote it first, but each version reflects their experiences.

You ever think that they're all original, but say the same thing?

Just a thought.


One vision, One purpose. The Technology of Peace! Peace Through Power!
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 12-16-09Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a version, handwritten by my uncle from the 1930's, while he was in the CCC. He later served and was killed in WW2. His version was included in my book, Patton's Troubleshooters:

“Hitch In Hell”


I am sitting here and thinking of the things I left behind, and I hate to put on paper what is running through my mind. We've dug a million ditches, we've cleared a million miles of ground, and a meaner place this side of hell on earth will never be found, but there is some consolation, gather closely while I tell. When we die we'll go to Heaven, 'cause we've done our hitch in hell.



We've built a million kitchens for the cooks to stew our beans, we've stood a million guard mounts and cleaned the camp latrines. The number of trees we've chopped is very hard to tell, but there'll be no trees in Heaven, for we've done our hitch in hell.



We've built a million bridges, we've walked through miles of mud, we've cleaned a million mess kits and peeled a million spuds, we've shoveled tons of gravel a million rocks we've lugged, but there'll be no rocks in Heaven for we've lugged our rocks in hell.



We've killed a million bed bugs out our dirty our eats. We've shook a million sheets. Ah, the number of nights we've frozen as low the mercury fell, but we'll not freeze in Heaven for we've done our hitch in hell.



We've heard a million whistles blow from morn' till late at night, so we'd like to kill the dirty bums who took away our rights. And the foremen we've had over us, how many we can't tell, but we'll bar them all from heaven 'till they've done their hitch in hell.



When the final call is sounded and we lay aside our cares, we'll do our big parade right up the golden stairs. The angels they will welcome us, their harps will start to play, and we'll draw a million canteen checks and spend them in a day. It's then we'll hear St. Peter greet us loudly with his yell. Take those front seats C.C.C. boys, you've done your hitch in hell.

After my book was published, I got a copy of the original poem, from my friend Don Schoo. The original version of this poem, and the oldest version I have found, dates before WW1 in 1916 when his relative was serving in the American Expedition in Mexico:

OUR HITCH IN HELL



I am sitting here and thinking of the things I've left behind,

And am writing down the little things as they run through my mind.

We have dug a thousand trenches, and cleaned a thousand miles of ground,

If there's a meaner place this side of Hell, it sure is still unfound,

But there still is one consolation, gather closely while I tell,

When we die we are bound for Heaven,

For we've done our hitch in Hell.



We have built a thousand kitchens,

For the cooks to burn our beans,

We have stood a thousand guards mounts,

And cleaned the camp latrines,

We have washed a thousand dishes,

And peeled ten thousand spuds,

We have made a million blanket rolls,

And have washed as many duds,

The number of parades we've stood,

Would be most hard to tell,

But we will not parade in Heaven,

As we've done our hitch in Hell.



We have killed a thousand rattlesnakes, that tried to steal our cots,

And shook a million centipedes, out of our army socks,

We have marched ten thousand miles,

And made a thousand camps,

And pulled a million cactus points out of our khaki pants.

But when our mission here is done, our friends will gently tell,

When they died, they went to Heaven,

For they had done their hitch in Hell.

When those final taps are sounded,

We'll parade the golden stairs,

And the Angels there will welcome us,

And play their Heavenly airs,

Then will St. Peter tell us, with a loud and mighty yell,

"Take a front seat up in Heaven boys, for you have done your hitch in Hell."



Albert P. Schoo

Company A, Third Illinois Infantry

Camp Wilson, San Antonio, Texas

December, 1916
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 06-05-15Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is my first time logging into quoteland.com. I'm 60 years old and have held on to my father's WWII memorabilia and war stories for many many decades. One item in particular now brings me to the Internet, and to this forum.
I have a post card mailed July 25, 1942 from Parris Island. On it is the poem, The Marine. The post card is from Private Chas R. Wussoloski Platoon No 373 Recruit Depot to his cousin in the Army, Private John Wesalowski in Battery C 77th Division Fort Jackson, SC, letting him know he is reposting to Indian Head, Maryland. John was my father's machine gunner. John told my father that Chas wrote the poem and had post cards made for all his buddies, and used the pen name, compliments of "Charlie R. Walker."
Now most of you are STILL correct with your history. The phrase, " another soldier reporting sir," and "served in Hell," have been tossed about the services for quite some time, and I do believe well before WWII. I believe the poem, "The Marine" were the phrase, "Another MARINE reporting , Sir, I've served my time in Hell" was penned by Charlie R. Walker. He did so no later than mid-1942, but more likely a bit earlier because he printed the post cards and distributed them. By July 1942, he was already stationed in Maryland.
I hope this adds additional clarity rather than fuel to someone's fire.
If anyone would like a scan copy of the postcard, please email me at: prichardson11@aol.com.
I am already working with one of the Marine Associations to document this history.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 08-23-15Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sorry, gentlemen, I forgot to add: the verses about Korea and Vietnam are not in the original 1942 poem, The Marine.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 08-23-15Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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